In the tables here I set out some passages which enable one quickly to distinguish the source of any particular text of a Henry James ‘tale’ (short story). This page is an adjunct to my tales in collections index. The examples are from near the beginnings and endings of the tales: hopefully they are therefore relatively easy-to-find and, if both ends of a reprinted text are from the same source, you can be fairly confident that there is no ‘funny business’ on the way through! I have concentrated on providing variant words, because punctuation, although an important part of James’s revisions, may be subject to the whim of an over-zealous editor and cannot be a reliable guide as to which source is being used.

Please note the following points :

Mostly the variants here are not significant for the narrative meaning of the text, only for its flow, imagery or clarity, but I would like to take this opportunity to point out that in the case of Pandora the last example changes the implied speaker of the indirect reported speech!

alphabetical index

(all tale titles are shown : those not yet having a table of variants are ‘greyed out’, with the subset having no variant versions to tabulate in italic lighter grey)

The abasement of the Northmores Flickerbridge Madame de Mauves Professor Fargo
Adina Fordham Castle The madonna of the future The pupil
The altar of the dead Four meetings The marriages The real right thing
The Aspern papers The friends of the friends Master Eustace The real thing
At Isella Gabrielle De Bergerac Maud-Evelyn The romance of certain old clothes
The author of Beltraffio Georgina’s reasons The middle years Rose-Agathe
The beast in the jungle The ghostly rental Miss Gunton of Poughkeepsie A round of visits
The Beldonald Holbein The given case Mme. de Mauves The siege of London
The bench of desolation Glasses The modern warning Sir Dominick Ferrand
Benvolio The great condition Mora Montravers Sir Edmund Orme
The birthplace The great good place A most extraordinary case The solution
Broken wings Greville Fane Mrs Medwin The special type
Brooksmith Guest’s confession Mrs Temperly The story in it
A bundle of letters The impressions of a cousin My friend Bingham The story of a masterpiece
The chaperon In the cage A New England winter The story of a year
Collaboration An international episode The next time The sweetheart of M. Briseux
Cousin Maria Jersey Villas Nona Vincent Théodolinde
Covering End John Delavoy Osborne’s revenge The third person
The Coxon fund The jolly corner Owen Wingrave The tone of time
Crapy Cornelia Julia Bride Pandora A tragedy of error
Crawford’s consistency Lady Barberina/ Barbarina The papers Travelling companions
Daisy Miller : a study A landscape painter A passionate pilgrim The tree of knowledge
A day of days The last of the Valerii Paste The turn of the screw
De Grey: a romance The lesson of the master The Patagonia Two countries
The death of the lion The liar The path of duty The two faces
The diary of a man of fifty A light man The Pension Beaurepas The velvet glove
Eugene Pickering A London life The point of view The visit(s)
‘Europe’ Longstaff’s marriage Poor Richard The way it came
The faces Lord Beauprey/ Beaupré The private life The wheel of time
The figure in the carpet Louisa Pallant A problem
variants checklist
A landscape painter
s. magazine (1866) first book (1885)
throughout Blunt Quarterman
Esther Miriam
Johnson Prendergast
1 6 …which I have always assigned to the famous statue. …which I have always attributed to the famous statue.
last all “A false woman? No, – simply of a woman. I am a woman, Sir.” And she began to smile. “Come, you be a man!” “A false woman? No, it was the act of any woman – placed as I was placed. You don’t believe it?” And she began to smile. “Come, you may abuse me in your diary if you like – I shall never peep into it again!”

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A day of days
s. magazine (1866) first book (1885)
throughout Laura B. Laura Benton
Madison Perkins Weatherby Pynsent
1 1 Mr. Herbert Moore, a gentleman of some note… Mr. Herbert Moore, a gentleman of the highest note…
1 6 She had spent a Summer in Europe,… She had spent a summer or two in Europe,…
last two
[last]
7–9, 1
[7–9]
“Why spoil it? She is an admirable girl: to have learned that is enough for me.” He raised her hand to his lips, pressed them to it, dropped it, reached the door and bounded out of the garden gate.
    The day was ended.
“Why spoil it? She’s a different sort from any I have met, and just to have seen her like this – that is enough for me.” He raised her hand to his lips, pressed them to it, dropped it, reached the door, and bounded out of the garden-gate.

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Poor Richard
the magazine text appeared in three parts; the book text is divided into seven chapters (part 1 into 1–4, part 2 to chapter 5 and part 3 to chapters 6 and 7)
ch. s. magazine (1867) first book (1885)
throughout Richard Clare Richard Maule
James Luttrel Robert Luttrel
1 1 1 …and at its farther extremity was bounded by a narrow meadow, which… …and at its farther extremity was bounded by a large pasture, which…
1 2 1 She herself had been positively plain,… She herself would have been positively plain,…
3 [7]
(last)
last last …although, as she is by this time twenty-seven years of age, a little romance is occasionally invoked to account for her continued celibacy. …although, as she is by this time nearly thirty years of age, some little romantic episode in the past is vaguely alluded to as accounting for her continued celibacy.

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The romance of certain old clothes
the 1885 text is divided into two chapters
ch. s. magazine (1868) first book (1875) revised book (1885)
throughout Viola Viola Rosalind
Willoughby Willoughby Wingrave
[1] 1 1–2
[1]
Toward the middle … of three children. Her name is of little account: I shall take the liberty of calling her Mrs. Willoughby, – a name, like her own, of a highly respectable sound. Toward the middle … of three children. Her name is of little account: I shall take the liberty of calling her Mrs. Willoughby, – a name, like her own, of a highly respectable sound. Towards the middle … of three children, by name Mrs. Veronica Wingrave.
[1] 1 1 …and had devoted herself to the care of her children. These latter grew up… …and had devoted herself to the care of her progeny. These young persons grew up… …and had devoted herself to the care of her progeny. These young persons grew up…
[2 (last)] -12 7 It was a revolting thought that these glorious fabrics should wait on the bidding of a little girl… It was a revolting thought that these exquisite fabrics should await the commands of a little girl… It was a revolting thought that these exquisite fabrics should await the good pleasure of a little girl…
[2 (last)] last last …and on her bloodless brow and cheeks …and on her bloodless brow and cheeks …and on her blanched brow and cheeks

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A most extraordinary case
the 1885 text is divided into nine chapters
ch. s. magazine (1868) first book (1885)
throughout McCarthy Masters
Van Zandt Middlemas
[1] 1 1 …just as the war had come to a close, …just as the War had come to an end,
[1] 1 2 …superscribed Mrs. Samuel Mason,… …superscribed Mrs. Augustus Mason,…
[9] (last) last last four [last two] Miss Hofmann’s wedding was, of course, not deferred. She was married in September, “very quietly.” It seemed to her lover, in the interval, that she was very silent and thoughtful. But this was certainly natural under the circumstances. Miss Hofmann’s nuptials were of course not deferred; they took place in October, “very quietly.” It seemed to her lover in the interval that she was very silent and thoughtful; but this certainly was natural under the circumstances.

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A light man
s. magazine (1869) first book (1884) revised book (1885)
1 4 …but it’s easier to preserve the habit than to drop it. …but it’s easier to stick to the habit than to drop it. …but it’s easier to stick to the habit than to drop it.
1 14 …two deplorable obstructions. …two deplorable obstructions. …two deplorable impediments.
-4 4 (last) …his eyes starting in his head. …his eyes starting in his head. …his eyes starting out of his head.
last last
[last two]
I’m sure I can’t say. I am sure I can’t say. Yes, I shall wait for Miss Meredith. I am sure I can’t say. Yes, I shall wait for Miss Meredith.

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A passionate pilgrim
A passionate pilgrim appeared in two parts on its original magazine publication; these remained in the subsequent book appearances until four chapters were created in the New York edition – this last revision also has different paragraphing; because there are five texts to compare, there are more than the usual number of examples here (and apologies that they’re squeezed into three columns!)
ch. s. mag./book (1871/75) rev. book (1884/85) NYE (1908)
throughout John Simmons Abijah Simmons Abijah Simmons
throughout Lockley Park Lockley Park Lackley
throughout Herefordshire 1884 : Slantshire |
1885 : Slopeshire
Middleshire
1 1 1 …England, of which I had dreamed much but as yet knew nothing. …England, of which I had dreamed much but as yet knew nothing. …England, to which country my mind’s eye only had as yet been introduced.
1 1 4 …bespoke my dinner of the very genius of decorum,… …bespoke my dinner of the genius of “attendance,” …bespoke my dinner of the genius of “attendance,”…
1 2 1 …English life is a fact which I never fairly probed to
[1871 : the | 1875 : its] depths.
…English life is a fact I never have got to the bottom of. …English life was a matter I meanwhile failed to get to the bottom of.
1 2 12 …dreamed of lamb and spinach and a
[1871 : rhubarb tart
…dreamed of lamb and spinach and a
[1884 : charlotte-russe
…dreamed of lamb and spinach and a salade de saison,…
| 1875 : charlotte-russe],… | 1885 : salade de saison],…
2
[4]
(last)
-16 1 “Really, this is too much; I can’t,” our friend protested in a tremulous voice. “Really, this is too much; I can’t,”
[1884 : our friend | 1885 : the poor man] protested, in a tremulous voice.
“Really this is too much; I can’t,” the poor man protested, almost scared and with tears in his eyes.
2
[4]
(last)
-2 1 …the doctor had silently attested it,… …the doctor had silently
[1884 : assured us of
…the doctor had silently attested it,…
| 1885 : attested] it,…
2
[4]
(last)
last -2 …beneath one of the mightiest of English yews and the little tower than which none in all England has a softer and
[1871 : older | 1875 : hoarier] grey.
…beneath one of the blackest and widest of English yews and the little tower than which none in all England has a softer and hoarier gray. …beneath one of the blackest and widest of English yews and the little tower than which none in all England has a softer and hoarier grey.

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Master Eustace
the 1885 text is divided into six chapters
ch. s. magazine (1871) first book (1885)
[1] 1 1 …an operation she performed with a delicate old-maidish precision… …an operation she performed with an old-maidish precision…
[1] 2 11 …but Mrs. Garnyer made service easy. …but Mrs. Garnyer made bondage very easy.
[6] (last) -7 11 (last) [para. beg. : I knew what was coming,…]
I saw his face crimson through his fingers. I saw his face burning red through his fingers.

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The madonna of the future
The madonna of the future has three chapters in the New York edition only
ch. s. mag./book (1873/75) rev. book (1879) NYE (1908)
[1] 1 1–2 …high level of the best. Our host had been showing us… …high level of perfection. Our host had been showing us… …high level of perfection. Our host had shown us…
[1] 2 9–10 …like some
[1873 : young god of | 1875 : embodied] Defiance. In a moment I recognized him as Michael Angelo’s David.
…like a sentinel who has taken the alarm. In a moment I recognised him as Michael Angelo’s David. …like a sentinel roused by some alarm and in whom I at once recognised Michael Angelo’s famous David.
[3] (last) last last …among the ruins of
[1873: Roman greatness
…among the ruins of triumphant Rome… …among the ruins of triumphant Rome…
| 1875: triumphant Rome]…
[3] (last) last last …I seemed to hear a fantastic, impertinent murmur,… …I seemed to hear a fantastic, impertinent murmur, …I seemed to catch the other so impertinent and so cynical echo:

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The last of the Valerii
s. magazine (1874) first book (1875) revised book (1885)
throughout Camillo Camillo Marco
1 2 …thinking, indeed, that from the picturesque point of view… …thinking, indeed, that from the picturesque point of view… …thinking, indeed, that from the pictorial point of view…
1 4 I don’t know that I am addicted to rudeness; but… I don’t know that I am particularly addicted to rudeness, but… I don’t know that I usually miss that effect, but…
-4 7 He had missed the Juno – and rejoiced! He had missed the Juno – and drawn a long breath! He had missed the Juno – and drawn a long breath!
-2 1 (all) “Ah, – a Roman?” said the gentleman, with a smirk. “Ah, – a Roman?” said the gentleman, with a smirk. “Ah – a Roman?” asked the gentleman, with a smirk.

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Mme. De Mauves/Madame de Mauves
the title (in both senses!) was expanded in the book editions; the New York edition has some re-paragraphing
ch. s. mag./book (1874/75) rev. book (1879) NYE (1908)
1 1 4 …terrace had chosen not to forget [1874 : it. | 1875 : this.] …terrace had chosen not to forget this. …terrace had preferred to keep this in mind.
1 6
[4]
1 …American, but essentially both, on a closer scrutiny. …American; but she was essentially both, on a closer scrutiny. …American, but essentially both for the really seeing eye.
9 (last) -2 9 …a friend of Euphemia’s lovely sister-in-law,… …a friend of Euphemia’s charming sister-in-law,… …a friend of that charming sister of the Count’s,…
9 (last) last last …conscious of a singular feeling, [1875 : – a feeling] for which awe would be hardly too strong a name. …conscious of a singular feeling – a feeling for which awe would be hardly too strong a name. …conscious of a singular feeling – a feeling of wonder, of uncertainty, of awe.

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Eugene Pickering
ch. s. magazine (1874) first book (1875) revised book (1879, 1883)
1 1 1 It was at Homburg, several years ago, before the play had been suppressed. It was at Homburg, several years ago, before the gaming had been suppressed. It was at Homburg, several years ago, before the gaming had been suppressed.
1 1 8 …and proposing an adjournment to the damask divans of the Kursaal,… …and proposing an adjournment to the damask divans of the Kursaal,… …and proposing an adjournment to the silken ottomans of the Kursaal,…
1 10 3 [para. beg. : “Yes, we were very good friends,…]
…passing his hand over his eyes, “I’m half dazed and bewildered at finding myself… …passing his hand over his eyes, “I’m dazed and bewildered at finding myself… …passing his hand over his eyes, “I am rather dazed, rather bewildered at finding myself…
2 (last) -5 8 [para. beg. : Cruel indeed, I declared,…]
He recovered in a measure the ample speech with which… He recovered in a measure the generous eloquence with which… He recovered in a measure the generous eloquence with which…
2 (last) last 2 (last) I had risked the conjecture that Miss Vernor was a lovely creature,… I had risked the conjecture that Miss Vernor was a lovely creature,… I had risked the conjecture that Miss Vernor was a charming creature,…

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Benvolio
ch. s. magazine (1875) first book (1879)
1 1 3 …I have always found it agreeable to observe. …I have always found it profitable to observe.
1 2 2 He was more than twenty-five years old, but the was not yet thirty-five; he had a little property; he followed no regular profession. He was about to enter upon the third decade of our mortal span; he had a little property, and he followed no regular profession.
7 (last) 6 (last) -12 He succeeded in a fashion, but it seemed dreary – doubly dreary when he reflected what it might have been. He only half succeeded in a fashion; it seemed dark and empty; doubly empty when he remembered what it might have been.

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Four meetings
the original chapter 2 of Four meetings was split in the book versions, making a later total of four numbered chapters instead of three
ch. s. magazine (1877) first book (1879) NYE (1909)
int. ¶ 1 1 I saw her but four times, but I remember them vividly: she made an impression upon me. I saw her only four times, but I remember them vividly; she made an impression upon me. I saw her but four times, though I remember them vividly; she made her impression on me.
int. ¶ 1 2 …a charming specimen of a type. …a charming specimen of a type. …a touching specimen of a type with which I had other and perhaps less charming associations.
1 1 1 The first one took place in the country, at a little tea-party,… The first one took place in the country, at a little tea-party,… The first was in the country, at a small tea-party,…
3
[4]
(last)
last last …I reflected that poor Miss Spencer had been right in her presentiment that she should still see something of Europe. …I reflected that poor Miss Spencer had been right in her presentiment that she should still see something of that dear old Europe. …I could feel how right my poor friend had been in her conviction at the other, the still intenser, the now historic crisis, that she should still see something of that dear old Europe.

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Théodolinde/Rose-Agathe
s. magazine (1878) first book (1885)
throughout Théodolinde Rose-Agathe
1 5–6
[5–7]
…adjacent to the restaurant. Then there was a woman… …adjacent to the restaurant. It had above it the sign, “Anatole, Coiffeur;” these artists, in Paris, being known only by their Christian name. Then there was a woman…
1 8
[9]
…standing in the various attitudes of imminent empressement, the agreeable dame de comptoir sitting idle for the moment …standing in the various attitudes of imminent eagerness, the agreeable dame de comptoir, sitting idle for the moment…
-7 1 (all) “It will last as long, I hope, as she does herself,” I answered. “It will last as long, I hope, as she herself does!

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Daisy Miller : a study
Daisy Miller : a study had no chapter numbers in its original two-part magazine form: a bracketed alternative for this is given (instead of the brackets being for the later edition). To aid you in finding the very useful second example, it is a two-sentence speech paragraph during the first discussion between Winterbourne and Mrs Costello.
The subtitle of this tale was dropped in the New York edition, but its absence from a reprint is no indication of the text used.
ch. s. magazine (1878) first book (1879) NYE (1909)
1 1 1–2 …hotel. There are, indeed, many hotels; for the entertainment… …hotel. There are, indeed, many hotels; for the entertainment… …hotel; there are indeed many hotels, since the entertainment…
2 22
[116]
1–2
(all)
“Ah, you are cruel!” said the young man. “She’s a very nice young girl.” “Ah, you are cruel!” said the young man. “She’s a very nice girl.” “Ah you ’re cruel!” said the young man. “She ’s a very innocent girl.”
4 (last) 55
=-84
9–11 [para. beg. : “The little Italian. / New York edition : “The shiny – but, to do him justice,…]
…pretty and interesting. I rather doubt that he dreams of marrying her. That must appear… …pretty and interesting. I rather doubt whether he dreams of marrying her. That must appear… …pretty and interesting. Yes, he can’t really hope to pull it off. That must appear…
4 (last) 58
=-81
1 (only) “Ah! but the avvocato can’t believe it,” said Mrs. Costello. “Ah! but the cavaliere can’t believe it,” said Mrs. Costello. “Ah but the cavaliere avvocato does n’t believe them!” cried Mrs. Costello.
4 (last) -2 3 (last) …too long in foreign parts.” …too long in foreign parts.” …too long in foreign parts.” And this time she herself said nothing.
4 (last) last 1 Nevertheless, he went back… Nevertheless, he went back… Nevertheless he soon went back…

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Longstaff’s marriage
s. magazine (1878) first book (1879)
throughout Gosling Josling
1 1 …which is notoriously the envy of their foreign sisters, …which is notoriously the envy and despair of their foreign sisters,
1 6 …the old sailing-vessel which was to bear her to the lands she had dreamed of. …the old sailing-vessel which was to bear her to foreign lands.
-11 3 [para. beg. : He looked at her again…]
The clergyman, too, looked at her, marveling; but he consented… The clergyman, too, looked at her, in much surprise; but he consented…

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An international episode
the magazine publication of An international episode was in two parts, but both book versions are divided into six chapters
ch. s. magazine (1878) first book (1879) NYE (1908)
1 1 2 …much struck with the fervid temperature of that city. …much struck with the fervid temperature of that city. …much struck with the high, the torrid temperature.
1 20 last …American citizens doing homage to an hotel-clerk.
    By bed-time – in their impatience…
…American citizens doing homage to an hotel-clerk.
    “I’m glad he didn’t tell us … Fifth Avenue, where, for instance, he had told them that all the first families … [three new paragraphs] … also apparently more of a moralist.
    By bed-time – in their impatience…
…American citizens doing homage to an hotel-clerk.
    “I ’m glad he did n’t tell us … Fifth Avenue, where he had for instance told them all the first families … [three paragraphs with some further variants] … also apparently more of a moralist.
    By bedtime – in their impatience…
[6] (last) last last But Bessie Alden seemed to regret nothing. But Bessie Alden seemed to regret nothing. But Bessie Alden, strange and charming girl, seemed to regret nothing.

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The Pension Beaurepas
the New York edition has minor changes in paragraphing
ch. s. magazine (1879),
US book (1883)
first book (1881) NYE (1908)
1 1 2 I had moreover been told that a boarding-house… I had, moreover, been told that a boarding-house… I had further been told that a boarding-house…
1 1 24
=-5
[-6]
…I believe Madame Beaurepas would have contented herself with remarking that the proceeding was misplaced. …I believe Madame Beaurepas would have contented herself with remarking that the proceeding was out of place. …I believe Madame Beaurepas would have been satisfied to remark that this receptacle was not the place for arsenic. She could have imagined it otherwise and suitably applied.
9 (last) -6
[-5]
1 Mr. Ruck was still looking round the shop; he was still whistling a little. Mr. Ruck was still vaguely inspecting the shop; he was still whistling a little. Mr. Ruck still vaguely examined the shop; he still just audibly whistled.
9 (last) last last …with my luggage, the family had not returned. …with my luggage, the family had not returned. …with my luggage these interesting friends had not returned.

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The diary of a man of fifty
the following table lists all the fully substantive variants between the matching magazine texts and the matching book texts: there are, additionally, four spoken contractions (he’s, I’m) expanded in the books; there are no chapters as such but to make finding paragraphs slightly easier I have counted them within ‘diary dates’
date s. magazine (1879, both) first book (1879, 1880, 1883)
[April] 6th 1 14 She died ten years ago, and yet, as I sat there in the evening stillness,… She died ten years ago, and yet, as I sat there in the sunny stillness,…
[April] 8th 83
[83–84]
1–2
[1, 1]
My companion listened to all this. “The Andrea del Sarto is there;… My companion listened to all this. <new para.>
    “The Andrea del Sarto is there;…
[April] 26th 3 7 [para. beg. : “I admit I am inconsistent,…]
Those are the rare moments of life. These are the rare moments of life.
[April] 26th 20 1–2
(all)
“She has begged me to listen to everything you may say against her. She prefers that; she has a good conscience. “She has begged me to listen to everything you may say against her. She declares that she has a good conscience.
[May] 7th 27 6 [para. beg. : “She asked me what I would have? …]
We had a passionate quarrel,… We had a passionate argument,…
[May] 7th 35 1 “There is nothing so analystic [sic both] as disillusionment. “There is nothing so analytic as disillusionment.
[May] 11th 9 1 “But yours is abominable,” she declared, with a laugh. “But yours is abominable!” she exclaimed [1883 : exclaimed,] with a laugh.

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A bundle of letters
the last three paragraphs of the 1881 text are made into a single one in the New York edition
ch. s. first book (1881) NYE (1908)
1 1 1–2 I have kept you posted as far as Tuesday week last, and, although my letter will not have reached you yet, I will begin another, before my news accumulates too much. I am glad you show my letters round in the family, for I like them all to know I am doing, and I can’t write to every one, though I try to answer all reasonable expectations. I ’ve kept you posted as far as Tuesday week last, and though my letter won’t have reached you yet I ’ll begin another before my news accumulates too much. I ’m glad you show my letters round in the family, for I like them all to know what I ’m doing, and I can’t write to every one, even if I do try to answer all reasonable expectations.
9 (last) -2
[-1]
3–4
[7–8]
I haven’t decided what country I will visit yet; it seems as if there were so many to choose from. But I shall take care to pick out… I have n’t decided what country I ’ll visit next; it seems as if there were so many to choose from. But I must take care to pick out…

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The point of view
the magazine text has a footnote to the name ‘Church’ in the the first heading: ‘The author takes the liberty of referring the reader to a little tale entitled “The Pension Beaurepas”.’
ch. s. magazine (1882) first book (1883) NYE (1908)
1 1 5 …round the deck makes a mile,… …round the deck makes a mile,… …round the deck make a mile,…
1 1 9 …in sight of land, and we are soon to enter the Bay of New York,… …in sight of land, and we are soon to enter the Bay of New York,… …in sight of land, and are soon to enter the Bay of New York…
1 1 12–13 …on the other hand, Mamma, as you know, was dreadfully severe. She is severe to this day;… …on the other hand, mamma, as you know, was dreadfully severe. She is severe to this day;… …on the other hand, mamma, as you know, had what she called a method with me. She has it to this day;…
3 1 33 The long lines of the far shores are soft and pure, though there are places that… The long lines of the far shores are soft and pure, though they are places that… The long lines of the far shores are soft and pure, though they are places that…
8 (last) last last But, fancy us in the West! But, fancy us in the West! But fancy us at Oshkosh!

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The siege of London
the following table includes the only three substantive differences between the magazine and first-book texts, two of which relate to the same French phrase on both its appearances; as shown, the penultimate three paragraphs of the 1883 text are made into a single one in the New York edition
ch. s. magazine (1883) first book (1883) NYE (1908)
throughout San Diego San Diego San Pablo
1 1 5 …appreciate certain details. …appreciate certain details. …appreciate details.
1 1 7 …instrument which was often only less injurious in effect than a double-barrelled pistol; but he was always very curious, and he was sure, … so he was pleased to qualify the masterpiece of an Academician – he would not be observed… …instrument which was often only less injurious in effect than a double-barrelled pistol; but he was always very curious, and he was sure, … so he was pleased to qualify the masterpiece of an Academician – he would not be observed… …instrument often only less injurious in effect than a double-barrelled pistol; but he was always very curious, and was sure, … so he was pleased to qualify the masterpiece of a contemporary – he should n’t be observed…
3 1 1 Elle ne se doute de rien!’ Elle ne doute de rien!’ Elle ne doute de rien!’
6 2 29 (=-4) …she had added, oblivious for the moment that she was at least as near to the age of the mother as to that of the son. …she had added, oblivious for the moment that she could scarcely pretend to belong to a budding generation. …she had added, forgetting for the moment that the crown of the maturer charm dangled before her at a diminishing distance.
8 30 9 [para. beg. : Littlemore winced at this. / New York edition : He winced at this –…]
Elle ne se doute de rien!’ Elle ne doute de rien!’ Elle ne doute de rien!’
10 (last) -4
[-2]
all …done differently.
    He spoke … blush.
    “Did you want…
…done differently.
    He spoke … blush.
    “Did you want…
…done differently. But he spoke … blush. “Did you want…
10 (last) last last …who in the world was Mrs. Headway. …who in the world was Mrs. Headway. …who in the world Lady Demesne “had been.”

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The impressions of a cousin
ch. s. magazine (1883) first book (1884)
1 1 9 …say to myself, How can I even endure Fifty-third Street? …say to myself, How can I even inhabit Fifty-third Street?
1 2 19 [sent. beg. : She doesn’t know that,…]
…for she wishes (very naturally) to think that he is a pearl of trustees. …for she wishes (very naturally) to think him a pearl of trustees.
2
(last)
November 20 5 …her old, sweet, trustful self, as far as I am concerned. …her old, sweet, trustful self, so far as I am concerned.
2
(last)
November 20 7 …things that I didn’t dare to consider too closely,… …things that I don’t dare to consider too closely,…

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Lady Barberina
Lady Barberina was subtly retitled Lady Barbarina in the New York edition
ch. s. magazine (1883) first book (1884) NYE (1908)
throughout Lady Barberina Lady Barberina Lady Barbarina
1 1 3 They were lost in the multitude of observers, and they belonged,… They were lost in the multitude of observers, and they belonged,… Lost in the multitude of observers they belonged,…
1 1 4–5 …but you would scarcely have noticed them. Nevertheless, in all that shining host, it is to them, obscure, that we must give our attention. …but you would scarcely have noticed them. Nevertheless, in all that shining host, it is to them, obscure, that we must give our attention. …but would scarcely have noticed them. It is to them, obscure, in all that shining host, that we must nevertheless give our attention.
1 1 25 [sentence beginning : Dexter Freer was…]
…a nose that rather drooped than aspired. …a nose that rather aspired than drooped. …a nose that rather drooped than aspired.
1 1 31 (= -5) She was full of intuitions of the most judicious sort; and though… She was full of intentions, of the most judicious sort; and though… She was full of intentions, of the most judicious sort and, though…
6 (last) -2 1–2 [para. beg. : The day after this,…]
…the reasons why she should not marry her Californian. Jackson was kind, he was affectionate; he kissed her and put his arm around her waist,… …the reasons why she should not unite herself with her Californian. Jackson was kind, he was affectionate; he kissed her and put his arm round her waist,… …the reasons why she should not marry her Californian. Jackson was kind, he was affectionate; he kissed her and put his arm round her waist,…
6 (last) last last Meanwhile it is as good as known that Jackson Lemon supports them. Meanwhile it is as good as known that Jackson Lemon supports them. Meanwhile it ’s as good as known that their really quite responsible brother-in-law supports them.

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The author of Beltraffio
the long last paragraph of the two earlier texts is divided in the New York edition
ch. s. magazine (1884) first book (1885) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 …I had kept my letter of introduction for three weeks… …I had kept my letter of introduction for three weeks… …I had kept my letter of introduction three weeks…
1 1 2 …he had the irritability as well as the brilliancy of genius. …he had the irritability as well as the brilliancy of genius. …he had the irritability as well as the dignity of genius.
1 1 3 …it was close to my grasp), would… …it was really at hand), would… …it was near at hand – would…
1 1 8 …beauty of execution and reality of matter. …beauty of execution and value of subject. …beauty of execution and “intimate” importance of theme.
4 (last) last 6
[3]
“She’ll treat him better after this,” I remember Miss Ambient saying, in response… “She’ll be nicer to him after this,” I remember Miss Ambient saying, in response… “She ’ll treat him better after this,” I remember her sister-in-law’s saying in response…
4 (last) last last When the new book came out – it was long delayed – she read it over as a whole, and her husband told me that a few months before her death – she failed rapidly after losing her son, sank into a consumption, and faded away at Mentone – during those few supreme weeks she even dipped into Beltraffio. When the new book came out – it was long delayed – she read it over as a whole, and her husband told me that a few months before her death – she failed rapidly after losing her son, sank into a consumption, and faded away at Mentone – during those few supreme weeks she even dipped into Beltraffio. When the new book came out (it was long delayed) she read it over as a whole, and her husband told me that during the few supreme weeks before her death – she failed rapidly after losing her son, sank into a consumption and faded away at Mentone – she even dipped into the black “Beltraffio”.

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Pandora
magazine text not (yet) available to me
ch. s. first book (1885) NYE (1908)
1 1 4 To watch from a point of vantage the struggles of later comers – of the uninformed, the unprovided, the bewildered – is an occupation… To watch from such a point of vantage the struggles of those less fortunate than ourselves – of the uninformed, the unprovided, the belated, the bewildered – is an occupation…
2 (last) last 2 …entered a carriage with Pandora,… …entered a carriage with Miss Day
2 (last) last 3 …to D. F. Bellamy,… …to Mr. D. F. Bellamy…
2 (last) last 3–4 (last) …that Pandora’s long engagement had terminated at the nuptial altar. He communicated this news to Mrs. Bonnycastle, who had not heard it, with the remark that there was now ground for a new induction as to the self-made girl. …that Pandora, a thousand other duties performed, had finally “got round” to the altar of her own nuptials. He communicated this news to Mrs. Bonnycastle, who had not heard it but who, shrieking at the queer face he showed her, met it with the remark that there was now ground for a new induction as to the self-made girl.

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A New England winter
ch. s. magazine (1884) first book (1884)
1 1 10 …looking up at her house, she had time to see that everything… …looking up at her house, she had had time to see that everything…
1 2 12 …she did not regard her life as especially cheerless; there were many others’ that were more denuded than hers. …she did not regard her life as especially cheerless; there were many others that were more denuded.
2 1 3 …as the object of an appeal in its nature somewhat precarious. …as the object of an appeal in its nature somewhat ambiguous.
7
(last)
last 6–7 …and yet she was vexed at Pauline’s pert resignation; it proved her to be superficial. She disposed of everything with her absurd little phrases, that were half slang and half quotation. …and yet she was vexed at Pauline’s pert resignation; it proved her to be so superficial. She disposed of everything with her absurd little phrases, which were half slang and half quotation.
7
(last)
last last 2 …and she smiled to think that the conscientious Susan should have descended, in her last resort, to an artifice, to a pretext. She had probably persuaded him she was tired of Joanna’s children. …and she smiled to think that the conscientious Susan should have descended, in the last resort, to an artifice, to a pretext. She had probably persuaded him she was out of patience with Joanna’s children.

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The path of duty
the following table shows all the substantive variants between the two sample publications of The path of duty: that is, all variants except those involving punctuation within sentences and printers’ spellings
ch. s. magazine (1884) first book (1885)
int. ¶ 19–20
[19]
…think they are. The result,… …think they are; the result,…
1 1 8 He was not an exemplary or edifying character,… He was not a person to admire or imitate,…
6 1 3 He didn’t mention Joscelind’s name,… He didn’t mention Joscelind,…
6 9 3 …was a very strange one indeed. …was a very strange one.
8 (last) 2 15–16
[15]
This seemed to me really ominous. It stuck in my mind… This seemed to me really ominous – it stuck in my mind…

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Cousin Maria / Mrs Temperly
on its book appearance, with revised title, the text was provided with a number of additional paragraph breaks (hence the alternative numberings here)
ch. s. magazine (1887) first book (1889)
1 11 12
(=-2)
…and there was something homely and cozy, a kind of rustic, motherly bonhomie,… …and there was something homely and cosy, a rustic, motherly bonhomie,…
1 15 6 She used every convenience that the civilization of her time offered her, in a superior, unprejudiced way, and would… She used, in a superior, unprejudiced way, every convenience that the civilisation of her time offered her, and would…
2 2
[4]
1 …surveyed in them with complacency the results of superior educative processes. …surveyed in them with complacency the results of her own superiority.
4 (last) 9
[13]
5–6 [para. beg. : On the whole he was glad,…]
…orchids with a double escort. Doubtless each wished to quit her, but didn’t wish to appear to give way to the other; … to give him, apart, a few minutes’ conversation. …orchids with a double escort. Her friends would wish to quit her but would not wish to appear to give way to each other; … to give him a few minutes’ conversation.
4 (last) 12
[16]
1 (only) …looking round the conservatory to see if the plants were all there. …looking round the conservatory as if to see if the plants were all there.

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Louisa Pallant
ch. s. magazine (1888) first book (1888) NYE (1908)
1 1 2 (last) …I flattered myself that I had nothing more to learn. …I flattered myself that I had nothing more to learn. …I flattered myself I had nothing more to learn.
1 2 1 …one lovely night… …one lovely night… …one beautiful night…
1 2 4 …watching the others with a kind of solemn dumbness. …watching the others as if they had paid for the privilege and were rather disappointed. …watching the others as if they had paid for the privilege and were rather disappointed.
6 (last) last -4 Mrs Gimingham’s photographs (such is her present name) may be obtained at the principal stationers. Mrs Gimingham’s photographs (such is her present name) may be obtained from the principal stationers. Mrs Gimingham’s admired photographs – such is Linda’s present name – may be obtained from the principal stationers.
6 (last) last last I related to her, as soon as I saw her, the substance of the story I have written here, and (such is the inconsequence of women) nothing… I related to her as soon as I saw her the substance of the story I have written here, and (such is the inconsequence of women) nothing… I put before her as soon as I next saw her the incidents here recorded, and – such is the inconsequence of women – nothing…

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The Aspern papers
ch. s. magazine (1888) first book (1888) NYE (1908)
throughout Miss Tita Miss Tita Miss Tina
1 1 1 …confidence; in truth without her I should have made… …confidence; in truth without her I should have made… …confidence; without her in truth I should have made…
1 1 2 It was she who invented the short cut, who severed the Gordian knot. It was she who invented the short cut, who severed the Gordian knot. It was she who found the short cut and loosed the Gordian knot.
1 1 12
[12–13]
…I remarked as much to Mrs. Prest, who, however, replied with profundity,… …I remarked as much to Mrs. Prest. She however replied with profundity,… …I remarked as much to Mrs. Prest. She replied however with profundity…
9 (last) last last When I look at it my distress at the loss of the letters becomes almost intolerable. When I look at it my chagrin at the loss of the letters becomes almost intolerable. When I look at it I can scarcely bear my loss – I mean of the precious papers.

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The liar
ch. s. magazine (1888) first book (1889) NYE (1908)
1 1 2 The curtains were drawn in this asylum, the candles were lighted, the fire was bright, and when … the comfortable little place became suggestive – seemed to promise a pleasant house, a various party, talks, acquaintances, affinities,… The curtains were drawn in this asylum, the candles were lighted, the fire was bright, and when … the comfortable little place became suggestive – seemed to promise a pleasant house, a various party, talks, acquaintances, affinities,… The curtains were drawn in this asylum, the candles lighted, the fire bright, and when … the comfortable little place might have been one of the minor instruments in a big orchestra – seemed to promise a pleasant house, a various party, talk, acquaintances, affinities,…
1 1 3 …profession to pay many country visits,… …profession to pay many country visits,… …profession often to pay country visits,…
1 1 5 …walls; he considered that these things gave a sort of measure of the culture, and even the character, of his hosts. …walls; he considered that these things gave a sort of measure of the culture and even of the character of his hosts. …walls; these things would give in a sort the social, the conversational value of his hosts.
3 (last) -7 3 [para. beg. : “Yes, your husband’s strange friend…]
He did not wish to frighten her; he only wished to communicate the impulse which would make her say,… He had no desire to frighten her; he only wanted to communicate the impulse which would make her say,… He did n’t want to scare or to shake her; he only wanted to communicate the impulse that would make her say:…
3 (last) last last two
[last four]
He would never go back – he couldn’t. She was still in love with the Colonel – he had trained her too well. He would never go back – he couldn’t. She was still in love with the Colonel – he had trained her too well. He would never go back – he could n’t. Nor should he ever sound her abyss. He believed in her absolute straightness where she and her affairs alone might be concerned, but she was still in love with the man of her choice, and since she could n’t redeem him she would adopt and protect him. So he had trained her.

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Two countries / The modern warning
the original name was changed in all the book editions
ch. s. magazine (1888) first book (1888, 1890)
1 1 2 …and to be vexed when he found they didn’t know them. …and to be vexed when he found they were ignorant of them.
1 1 5 …which were mainly negative to say that he couldn’t yet say when he should be able to start for the Continent. …which were mainly negative, mainly to say that he could not yet say when he should be able to start for the Continent.
1 1 9 Family feeling was strong among these three (though Macarthy’s manner of showing it was sometimes peculiar), and her affection for her son… Family feeling was strong among these three though Macarthy’s manner of showing it was sometimes peculiar, and her affection for her son…
7
(last)
-2 2 She was very well this morning, sir,” the lady’s-maid broke out, to Macarthy,… She was very well this morning, sir,’ the waiting-maid broke out, to Macarthy,…
7
(last)
last 9 He made him come back to Grosvenor Crescent; He made him return to Grosvenor Crescent;

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A London life
ch. s. magazine (1888) first book (1889) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 It was raining, apparently, but she didn’t mind –… It was raining, apparently, but she didn’t mind –… It seemed to be raining, but she did n’t mind –…
1 1 2 She was restless and so fidgetty [sic] that it was a pain;… She was restless and so fidgety that it was a pain;… She was so restless and nervous that it was a pain;…
1 2 1 The girl had been in England nearly a year, but there were some satisfactions… The girl had been in England more than a year, but there were some satisfactions The girl had been in England more than a year, but there were satisfactions
13 (last) -12 17–18
[17–19]
[para. beg. : She made no answer,…]
…her ladyship would have come herself, only she was too angry. It was a sort of proof of this that she had sent back… …her ladyship would have come herself, only she was too angry. She was very bad indeed. It was an indication of this that she had sent back… …her ladyship would have come herself if she had n’t been too angry. She was very bad indeed; it was revealed that her wrath was terrible; and it was truly rather a sign of this that she had sent back…
13 (last) last -4 …staying with some distant relatives… …staying with some distant relatives… …staying with distant relatives…
13 (last) last -3 …he himself has ideas of transmitting funds,… …he himself has ideas of transmitting funds,… …he himself has a project of transmitting funds,…

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The lesson of the master
ch. s. magazine (1888) first book (1892) NYE (1908)
throughout Bryanston Square Manchester Square Manchester Square
1 1 1 He had been informed that the ladies were at church, but that was corrected… He had been informed that the ladies were at church, but that was corrected… He had been told the ladies were at church, but this was corrected…
1 1 2 …great trees; but the fourth figure was not a gentleman, the one in the crimson dress which made so vivid a spot, told so as a “bit of colour” amid the fresh, rich green. …great trees; but the fourth figure was not a gentleman, the one in the crimson dress which made so vivid a spot, told so as a “bit of colour” amid the fresh, rich green. …great trees, while the fourth figure showed a crimson dress that told as a “bit of colour” amid the fresh rich green.
1 1 3 …if he wished to go first to his room. …if he wished first to go to his room. …if he wished first to go to his room.
1 1 4 …and liking to take a general imaginative possession of the new scene immediately, as he always did. …and liking to take a general perceptive possession of the new scene immediately, as he always did. …and liking to take at once a general perceptive possession of a new scene.
6 (last) 20 3 [para. beg. : He dressed quickly,… / New York edition : He dressed and drove quickly,…]
…going “on,” with the ovine, herdlike movement of London society at night. …going “on,” with the hunted, herdlike movement of London society at night. …going “on” with the hunted herdlike movement of London society at night.
6 (last) last last I may say for him, however, that if this event were to befall he would really be the very first to appreciate it: which is perhaps a proof that St. George was essentially right and that Nature dedicated him to intellectual, not to personal passion. I may say for him, however, that if this event were to befall he would really be the very first to appreciate it: which is perhaps a proof that St. George was essentially right and that Nature dedicated him to intellectual, not to personal passion. I may say for him, however, that if this event were to occur he would really be the very first to appreciate it: which is perhaps a proof that the Master was essentially right and that Nature had dedicated him to intellectual, not to personal passion.

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The Patagonia
ch. s. magazine (1888) first book (1889) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 …was a kind of foreshortened desert. …was a foreshortened desert. …was a foreshortened desert.
1 2 4 …so that it would be an act of consideration to prepare her mind. …so that it would be an act of consideration to prepare her mind. …so that I should be doing her a service to prepare her mind.
1 3 1 As I stood on her doorstep I remembered that as she had a son she might not after all be so lone; yet at the same time it was present to me that Jasper Nettlepoint … long since drawn him away from the maternal side. As I stood on her doorstep I remembered that as she had a son she might not after all be so lone; yet at the same time it was present to me that Jasper Nettlepoint … long since drawn him away from the maternal side. It came to me indeed as I stood on her door-step that as she had a son she might not after all be so lone; yet I remembered at the same time that Jasper Nettlepoint … long since diverted him from the maternal side.
1 3 last two
[last]
…I was more the old lady’s contemporary than Jasper’s. What was unpardonable was that in Germany I had never been near her daughter – the one who lived abroad. I knew she was fixed at Wiesbaden but I had quite forgotten the name of the Prussian diplomatist (much older than herself and now on the retired list) whom she had married. …I was more the old lady’s contemporary than Jasper’s. …I was more the mother’s contemporary than the son’s.
4 (last) last 7 It was not till afterwards that I thought that a little stupid of him. It was not till afterwards that I thought this a little stupid of him. It was not till afterwards that I thought this rather characteristically dull of him.
4 (last) last last two I told him first that she was ill. It was an odious moment. I told him first that she was ill. It was an odious moment. I broke ground by putting it, feebly, that she was ill. It was a dire moment.

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The solution
the magazine text is in three parts, with no chapter numbers and a line space after the introductory paragraph (so add one to the paragraph number in each of the first three examples to get that of the periodical); the magazine’s part three forms the whole of chapter four in the book text
ch. s. magazine (1889) first book (1892)
1 1 6 It was the slumbrous, pictorial Rome of the Popes,… It was the slumberous, pictorial Rome of the Popes,…
1 2 8 [=-2] …she had done battle for her precedence and had boomed out her little title. …she had done battle for her precedence and had roared out her luckless title.
1 9 2 …and none of its defects – he was, socially, a pure pearl. …and none of its defects – he was born for human intercourse.
pt 3
4
(last)
-2–-1 10 (last)–1 Of course I had myself to thank for it, for I not only cornered her with Wilmerding – I cornered her with Veronica.
    What she said to Veronica was no doubt that it was all a mistake…
Of course I had myself to thank for it, for I not only shut her up with Wilmerding – I shut her up with Veronica.
    What she said to Veronica in this situation was no doubt that it was all a mistake…
pt 3
4
(last)
last last but do you think that was sufficient? but do you suppose that was sufficient?

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The pupil
ch. s. magazine (1891) first book (1892) NYE (1908)
throughout Adolphus Ulick Ulick
1 2 2 …about her son which it was better that a boy of eleven… …about her son which it was better that a boy of eleven… …about her son that it was better a boy of eleven…
1 3 1 …who had first come into the room, as if to see for himself, as soon as Pemberton was admitted,… …who had first come into the room, as if to see for himself, as soon as Pemberton was admitted,… …who had come into the room as if to see for himself the moment Pemberton was admitted,…
5 5 1 “You know they don’t pay you up,” said Morgan, blushing and not looking up. “You know they don’t pay you up,” said Morgan, blushing and turning his leaves. “You know they don’t pay you up,” said Morgan, blushing and turning his leaves.
5 7 1 “It has been there a long time,” the boy replied, turning over his leaves. “It has been there a long time,” the boy replied, continuing his search. “It has been there a long time,” the boy replied rummaging his book.
5 23 -1 [para. beg. : Mr. and Mrs. Moreen looked at each other,…]
…but his wife had recourse, for the first time since Pemberton had been in the house, to haughtiness, reminding him that a devoted mother,… …but his wife had recourse, for the first time since the arrival of their inmate, to a fine hauteur, reminding him that a devoted mother,… …but his wife had recourse, for the first time since his domestication with them, to a fine hauteur, reminding him that a devoted mother,…
8 (last) last 1–2 “I told you he didn’t, my dear,” argued Mr. Moreen. He was trembling all over, and he was, in his way, as deeply affected as his wife. “I told you he didn’t, my dear,” argued Mr. Moreen. He was trembling all over, and he was, in his way, as deeply affected as his wife. “I told you he did n’t, my dear,” her husband made answer. Mr. Moreen was trembling all over and was in his way as deeply affected as his wife.

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Brooksmith
s. magazine (1891) first book (1892) NYE (1908)
1 5 Mr. Offord, the most agreeable, the most lovable of bachelors, was a retired diplomatist, living on his pension, confined by his infirmities to his fireside and delighted to be found there any afternoon in the year by such visitors as Brooksmith allowed to come up. Mr. Offord, the most agreeable, the most lovable of bachelors, was a retired diplomatist, living on his pension, confined by his infirmities to his fireside and delighted to be found there any afternoon in the year by such visitors as Brooksmith allowed to come up. Mr. Offord, the most agreeable, the most attaching of bachelors, was a retired diplomatist, living on his pension and on something of his own over and above; a good deal confined, by his infirmities, to his fireside and delighted to be found there any afternoon in the year, from five o’clock on, by such visitors as Brooksmith allowed to come up.
2 2 …to come merely once was a slight which nobody, I am sure, had ever put upon him. …to come merely once was a slight which nobody, I am sure, had ever put upon him. …to come merely once was a slight nobody, I ’m sure, had ever put upon him.
7 5 …in his cloistered white face and extraordinarily glossy hair,… …in his cloistered white face and extraordinarily polished hair,… …in his cloistered white face and extraordinarily polished hair,…
-2 2 He had not opened the door of the house to me, and I had not recognised him in the cluster of retainers in the hall. He had not opened the door of the house to me, and I had not recognised him in the cluster of retainers in the hall. He had n’t opened the door of the house to me, nor had I recognised him in the array of retainers in the hall.
-2 15
[-4]
…are supposed to lubricate the wheels of departure;… …are supposed to lubricate the process of departure;… …are supposed to lubricate the process of departure;…

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The marriages
the last two paragraphs of the 1892 text are made into a single one in the New York edition
ch. s. magazine (1891) first book (1892) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 …the hostess said, holding the girl’s hand and smiling. …the hostess said, holding the girl’s hand and smiling. …the hostess asked while she held the girl’s hand and smiled.
1 1 3 …she held up to her face, in a vague, protecting, sheltering way,… …she held up to her face, in a vague, protecting, sheltering way,… …she flourished about her face, in a vaguely protecting sheltering way,…
1 9 [para. beg. : He was going to his room,…]
3 …that she should hear her father come out again and mount to Godfrey’s room. …that she should hear her father come out again and go up to Godfrey. …that she should hear her father come out again and go up to Godfrey.
7 …upon which she came out and stole up to Godfrey. …upon which she came out and made her way to Godfrey. …upon which she came out and made her way to Godfrey.
4 (last) -2 3 Mrs. Churchley, perched higher than ever, rolled by without a recognition. Mrs. Churchley, perched higher than ever, rode by without a recognition. Mrs. Churchley, perched higher than ever, rode by without a recognition.
4 (last) last 5
[9]
…and she told papa that she thought I was horrid. …and she told papa that she thought I was horrid. …and she told papa she really thought me horrid.

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The chaperon
ch. s. magazine (1891) first book (1893) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 …close to the fire, and she sat there knitting and warming her knees. …close to the fire, where she sat knitting and warming her knees. …close to the fire, where she sat knitting and warming her knees.
1 1 2 …illiberal compression assumed by her lips in obedience to something that was passing in her mind. …illiberal compression assumed by her lips in obedience to something that was passing in her mind. …illiberal compression of her lips in obedience to something she had thought of.
1 1 8 (last) If she were thinking something out, she was thinking it thoroughly. If she was thinking something out, she was thinking it thoroughly. If she was studying a question she was studying it thoroughly.
5 (last) -4 -2 It owes a portion of this peculiar intensity of quietude to the fact that Mrs. Tramore… It owes a portion of its concentration to the fact that Mrs. Tramore… It owes a part of its concentration to the fact that Mrs. Tramore…
5 (last) -3–-2 all     “If it hadn’t been for you,” she replied, smiling, “she might have had her regular place at our fireside.”
    “Good heavens, how did I prevent it?” cried Captain Jay, with all the consciousness of virtue.
    “If it hadn’t been for you,” she replied, smiling, “she might have had her regular place at our fireside.”
    “Good heavens, how did I prevent it?” cried Captain Jay, with all the consciousness of virtue.
    “If it had n’t been for you,” she unsparingly replied – she is mistress of an odd deep irony – “mamma might have had her regular place at our fireside.”
    “Gracious goodness, how did I prevent it?” cried Captain Jay with all the consciousness of virtue.

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Sir Edmund Orme
the first book edition has a paragraphing error and the New York edition has some deliberate re-paragraphing, hence the alternative counts and the counting-backwards in the cited locations
s. magazine (1891) first book (1892) NYE (1908)
1 2 There is, however, nothing in the strange story to establish this point, which is, perhaps, not of importance. There is, however, nothing in the strange story to establish this point, which is, perhaps, not of importance. There is however nothing in the strange story to establish this point, now perhaps not of importance.
1 4 …and you may easily and will probably say that the tale is too extravagant to have had a demonstrable origin. …and you may easily and will probably say that the tale is too extravagant to have had a demonstrable origin. …and you may easily, and will probably, think it too extravagant to have had a palpable basis.
16
[14]
-2–-1
(last two)
[para. beg. : Mrs. Marden had made us promise…]
…as if it had been a full volume of sound – I heard the whole of the air. It was sweet, fresh music, and I was often to hum it over. …as if it had been a full volume of sound – I heard the whole of the air. It was sweet, fresh music – I was often to hum it over. …as if it had been a full volume of sound. I heard the whole of the air, and it was sweet fresh music, which I was often to hum over.
165
[166]
(= -13)
-2 [para. beg. : The question I asked her… / New York edition : She came out with me…]
I promised not to come too often and, for three months, not to speak to her of the question I had raised the day before. I promised not to come too often and not to speak to her for three months of the question I had raised the day before. I promised not to come too often and not to speak to her for three months of the issue I had raised the day before.
last 1 …(it was like a waft from a great tempest),… …(it was like a waft from a great tempest),… …(it was like a waft from a great storm)…

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Nona Vincent
ch. s. magazine (1892) first book (1893)
1 1 3 …which was simply a sort of ordered diffusion of her presence, so soothing,… …which was simply a sort of distillation of herself, so soothing,…
1 1 1 …had forgotten, in her great warm, golden drawing-room,… …had forgotten, in her warm, golden drawing-room,…
2 (last) -2 2 (last) You know how she dresses!” she cried. You know how she dresses!”
2 (last) last last Mrs. Alsager continues to take boxes. At these representations Mrs. Alsager continues frequently to be present.

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The private life
s. magazine (1892) first book (1893) NYE (1908)
1 2 …one of those impressions which make up… …one of those impressions which make up… …one of those impressions that make up…
1 5 …and for a week, there, we had had company and weather. …and for a week we had had company and weather. …and for a week we had had company and weather.
2 6 We were of the same general communion, we participated in the same miscellaneous publicity. We were of the same general communion, we participated in the same miscellaneous publicity. We were of the same general communion, chalk-marked for recognition by signs from the same alphabet.
last -4 Mrs. Adney had vanished when we came down; … finished his play, and she produced it. Mrs. Adney had vanished when we came down; … finished his play, which she produced. Blanche had vanished when we came down; … finished his play, which she produced.

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The real thing
the magazine text is divided into chapters, but the first of these does not carry its number
ch. s. magazine (1892) first book (1893) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 When the porter’s wife (she used to answer the house-bell), announced “A gentleman – with a lady, sir,” I had, as I often had in those days, for the wish was father to the thought, an immediate vision of sitters. When the porter’s wife (she used to answer the house-bell), announced “A gentleman – with a lady, sir,” I had, as I often had in those days, for the wish was father to the thought, an immediate vision of sitters. When the porter’s wife, who used to answer the house-bell, announced “A gentleman and a lady, sir,” I had, as I often had in those days the wish being father to the thought – an immediate vision of sitters.
1 1 3 However, there was nothing at first to indicate that they might not have come for a portrait. However, there was nothing at first to indicate that they might not have come for a portrait. There was nothing at first however to indicate that they might n’t have come for a portrait.
1 1 4 …– I don’t mean either as a barber or a tailor –… …– I don’t mean as a barber or yet a tailor –… …– I don’t mean as a barber or yet a tailor –…
1 16 7–10 (last four)
[7] (last)
[para. beg. : It was only then that I understood…]
…I afterwards reflected. But that’s nothing; a portrait is almost always bad in direct proportion as it gratifies the original or his friends. He himself can please his friends; the triumph of the painter is to please his enemies; they can’t get over that. At any rate the delight of the sitter is in general a bad note. …I afterwards reflected. …I afterwards reflected.
4 (last) -3 5 …– I confess I should like to have been able to draw that –… …– I confess I should like to have been able to paint that –… …– I confess I should like to have been able to paint that –…
4 (last) last -2 …did me a permanent harm – got me into a second-rate trick. …did me a permanent harm, got me into a second-rate trick. …did me a permanent harm, got me into false ways.

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Lord Beauprey / Lord Beaupré
ch. s. magazine (1892) first book (1893)
throughout Beauprey Beaupré
1 2 1 …taken as a vocal translation of the act… …taken as a vocal rendering of the act…
1 2 2 …she put down her teacup with a little short, sharp movement, and, getting up,… …she put down her teacup with a failure of suavity and, getting up,…
6 (last) 52 1 “She had only to wait – to put an end to their deception, harmless… “She had only to wait – to put an end to their artifice, harmless…
6 (last) 55 1 I loathed their deception, harmless… I loathed their artifice, harmless…

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The visit / The visits
s. magazine (1892) first book (1893)
1 2–4 For a London epitaph that was almost elaborate, and the subject presently changed. I had taken many notes, but I didn’t mention it then. The following story is one of them – I took it down, verbatim, having that faculty, the day after I heard it. For a London epitaph that was almost exhaustive, and the subject presently changed. One of the listeners had taken many notes, but he didn’t confess it on the spot. The following story is a specimen of my exactitude – I took it down, verbatim, having that faculty, the day after I heard it.
2 3 …I would work her in, as they say. …I would work her in, as you say nowadays.
last 1–3 “Mother, mother,” the girl repeated, and poor Helen replied with a sound of passionate solicitation. “I–I–I–I—” her daughter stammered in the waiting hush. “I’m dying,” she substituted, she finished; and she died that night, after an hour, unconscious. “Mother, mother,” the girl repeated, and poor Helen replied with a sound of passionate solicitation. But her daughter only exhaled in the waiting hush, while I stood at the window where the dawn was faint, the most miserable moan in the world. “I’m dying,” she said, articulately; and she died that night, after an hour, unconscious.

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Jersey Villas / Sir Dominick Ferrand
ch. s. magazine (1892) first book (1893)
throughout Mrs. May Mrs. Ryves
Sidney May Sidney Ryves
1 1 2 …swallowed the matutinal muffin …swallowed his leathery muffin
1 2 7 …the really creative faculty. …the faculty really creative.
7 (last) last 7 …his affection was a still less negligeable [sic] quantity. …his affection was a quantity still less to be neglected.
7 (last) last 8 …of her goodness – their marriage … it – whether …of her general straightness (their marriage … it) whether

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Collaboration
s. magazine (1892) first book (1893)
1 2 …but I affirm without hesitation that my invitations are never declined. …but I rejoice in the distinction that my invitations are never declined.
1 5 The air is as cosmopolitan as only Parisian air can be;… The air is as international as only Parisian air can be;…
last 5-6 Where had she found it? How had she learned it? How had she got hold of it? How had she learned it?
last 10 …made on that occasion also an ineffaceable impression on her! …made on that occasion more than one intense impression.

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Greville Fane
s. newspaper (1892) first book (1893) NYE (1908)
1 2 Let her down easy, but not too easy.” Let her off easy, but not too easy.” Let her down easily, but not too easily.”
1 6 “I simply won’t qualify it,” I said to myself. “I simply won’t qualify it,” I said to myself. So I simply won’t qualify it,” I said.
2 4 …but poor Mrs. Stormer had passed beyond the reach of kind inquiries from colleagues. …but poor Mrs. Stormer had passed into a state in which the resonance of no earthly knocker was to be feared. …but poor Mrs. Stormer had passed into a state in which the resonance of no earthly knocker was to be feared.
-3 (third last) 1 “What is it?” she asked, looking hard at one of the pictures of the year,… “What is it?” she asked, looking hard at the picture of the year,… “What is it?” she asked, looking hard at the picture of the year,…
last last He really goes too far. He really goes too far. He really – with me at least – goes too far.

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The wheel of time
ch. s. magazine (1892–93) first book (1893)
throughout
(chapter 6)
Ripple Blankley
1 2 1–2 “Oh, yes, she’s nice. She’s a great comfort.” “Oh, yes, she’s nice enough. She’s a great comfort.”
1 5 1–2 …said Lady Greyswood, with an easy assumption. “I’ve known plain women whom everyone liked. …said Lady Greyswood, with more benevolence than logic. “I’ve known plain women who were liked.
1 6 2 “But everyone doesn’t like me! “But I’m not so awfully liked!
6 (last) -13 [-12] -1 She was white and she looked scared; she came to meet him in a wavering way. She was white and she looked scared; she faltered in her movement to meet him.
6 (last) -2 [-1] 2–3 He remembered what his mother told him of the grievous illness of Fanny Knocker. Poor little Vera lay there all flushed with a feverish cold, which… He remembered what his mother had told him of the grievous illness of Fanny Knocker. Poor little Vera lay there in the flush of a feverish cold which…

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Owen Wingrave
ch. s. magazine (1892) first book (1893) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 By heaven, I think you must be maa [sic = mad]!” cried Spencer Coyle, as the young man stood there, with a white face, panting a little and repeating,… Upon my honour you must be off your head!” cried Spencer Coyle, as the young man, with a white face, stood there panting a little and repeating… “Upon my honour you must be off your head!” cried Spencer Coyle, as the young man, with a white face, stood there panting a little and repeating…
1 1 2 …exasperating to his interlocutor, who however still discriminated sufficiently to see that his grimace (it was like an irrelevant leer) was the result of extreme and of quite pardonable nervousness. …exasperating to his interlocutor, who however still discriminated sufficiently to see that his grimace (it was like an irrelevant leer) was the result of extreme and conceivable nervousness. …exasperating to his supervisor, who however still discriminated sufficiently to feel his grimace – it was like an irrelevant leer – the result of extreme and conceivable nervousness.
1 2 1 (only) …but that is exactly why I feel I mustn’t go further,” poor Owen … through the window, for no purpose, to the stupid opposite houses the dry glitter of his eyes. …but that is exactly why I feel I mustn’t go further,” poor Owen … through the window to the stupid opposite houses the dry glitter of his eyes. …but that ’s exactly why it strikes me I must n’t go further,” poor Owen … through the window to the stupid opposite houses the dry glitter of his eyes.
4 (last) last -3 …the catastrophe that the next moment he found himself staring at on the threshold of an open door. …the catastrophe that the next moment he found himself aghast at on the threshold of an open door. …the catastrophe that the next moment he found himself aghast at on the threshold of an open door.
4 (last) last last He looked like a young soldier on a battle-field. He looked like a young soldier on a battle-field. He was all the young soldier on the gained field.

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The middle years
s. magazine (1893) first book (1895) NYE (1908)
1 3 …had always sounded second-rate to him, but now he was reconciled to the moderate. …had sounded like a mere advertisement, but now he was reconciled to the prosaic. …had sounded like a mere advertisement, but he was thankful now for the commonest conveniences.
1 4 …creeping to a convenient bench that he knew of,… …creeping to a convenient bench that he knew of,… …creeping to a bench he had already haunted,…
1 6 He was sufficiently tired when he reached it,… He was tired enough when he reached it,… He was tired enough when he reached it,…
-26 1 From that moment he was less and less present,… From that moment he was less and less present,… From that hour he was less and less present,…
-26 4
[4–5]
(last)
…suddenly opening his eyes to ask of him if he had spent the interval with the Countess. …suddenly opening his eyes to ask of him if he had spent the interval with the Countess. …suddenly opening his eyes to put a question. Had he spent those days with the Countess?
-8 to -6 all     “If you’ve doubted, if you’ve despaired you’ve always done it,” his visitor subtly argued.
    “We’ve done something,” Dencombe conceded.
    “Something is all. It’s the feasible. It’s you!
    “If you’ve doubted, if you’ve despaired, you’ve always ‘done’ it,” his visitor subtly argued.
    “We’ve done something or other,” Dencombe conceded.
    “Something or other is everything. It’s the feasible. It’s you!
    “If you ’ve doubted, if you ’ve despaired, you ’ve always ‘done’ it,” his visitor subtly argued.
    “We ’ve done something or other,” Dencombe conceded.
    “Something or other is everything. It ’s the feasible. It ’s you!

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The death of the lion
ch. s. magazine (1894) first book (1895) NYE (1908)
1 1 3 This was a weekly periodical, and had been supposed… This was a weekly periodical, and had been supposed… This was a weekly periodical, which had been supposed…
1 1 4 It was Mr. Deedy who had let it down so dreadfully:… It was Mr. Deedy who had let it down so dreadfully:… It was Mr. Deedy who had let the thing down so dreadfully:…
1 1 10 …was by no means in the middle of the heavens;… …was by no means in the centre of the heavens;… …was by no means in the centre of the heavens;…
1 12 8 …very much what had made Mr. Pinhorn bite. …very much what had made Mr. Pinhorn nibble. …very much what had made Mr. Pinhorn nibble.
10 (last) last 5 Perhaps some chance, blundering hand, some brutal ignorance has lighted kitchen-fires with it. Perhaps some hazard of a blind hand, some brutal ignorance has lighted kitchen-fires with it. Perhaps some hazard of a blind hand, some brutal fatal ignorance has lighted kitchen-fires with it.

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The Coxon fund
ch. s. magazine (1894) first book (1895) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 …but later, alone in the compartment… …but later, alone in the compartment… …but later on, alone in the compartment…
1 1 3 …put me into a frame for divining that we should all have the honour, sooner or later, of dealing with him as a whole. …put me into the frame of foreseeing how we should all, sooner or later, have the honour of dealing with him as a whole. …put me into the frame of foreseeing how we should all, sooner or later, have the honour of dealing with him as a whole.
1 1 5 He was staying with them for the winter: Adelaide dropped it in a tone which drew the sting from the temporary. He was staying with them all the winter: Adelaide dropped it in a tone which drew the sting from the temporary. He was to stay all the winter: Adelaide dropped it in a tone that drew the sting from the inevitable emphasis.
12 (last) last 2 …to watch the manna descend, as already drawing the magnificent income. …to watch the manna descend, was already drawing the magnificent income. …to watch the manna descend, had begun to draw the magnificent income.
12 (last) last 10–11
[10–12]
She and Kent are even yet looking for another prop, but everyone is so dreadfully robust. With Saltram the type was scattered, the grander, the elder style. She and Kent are even yet looking for another prop, but no one presents a true sphere of usefulness. They complain that people are self-sufficing. With Saltram the fine type of the child of adoption was scattered, the grander, the elder style. She and Kent are even yet looking for another prop, but no one presents a true sphere of usefulness. They complain that people are self-sufficing. With Saltram the fine type of the child of adoption was scattered, the grander, the elder style.

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The altar of the dead
there was no magazine appearance of this tale
ch. s. first book (1895) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 …and he disliked them still more when they made… …and loved them still less when they made…
1 1 2 …and there was only one of the former that found a place in his life. …and but one of the former found a place in his life.
9 (last) -4 2 …and while the apprehension deepened in her eyes… …and while the alarm deepened in her eyes…
9 (last) -3 1 …and she fell on her knees beside him with his arm on her shoulder. …and she fell on her knees beside him, his own arm round her shoulder.

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The next time
ch. s. magazine (1895) first book (1896) NYE (1908)
intro. 1 2 …and what leads me to record the incident is the train of memory lighted by that explanation. …and what leads me to record the incident is the train of memory lighted by that explanation. …and what prompts a note of the matter is the train of memory lighted by that explanation.
intro. 1 3 …with her having come in precisely as she came in this morning to bespeak my consideration for him. …with her having come in precisely as she came in this morning to bespeak my charity for him. …with her having come in, precisely as she came to-day before luncheon, to bespeak my charity for him.
1 1 4 Mrs. Stannace was never the woman to do anything:… Mrs. Stannace was seldom the woman to do anything:… Mrs. Stannace was seldom the woman to do anything:…
1 1 6 …pretty pink Maud to detach some one of the hundred (he wouldn’t be missed) from the cluster. …pretty pink Maud to detach some one of the hundred, who wouldn’t be missed, from the cluster. …pretty pink Maud to detach some one of the noble hundred, who wouldn’t be missed, from the cluster.
5 (last) last 2 …together by the fire, that he had been visited… …together by the fire, that he had been visited… …together by the fire, how he had been visited…
5 (last) last last How far it would have waked up the libraries is of course a very different question. I am not prepared to say it would have waked up the libraries. I am not prepared to say it would have waked up the libraries.

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The figure in the carpet
ch. s. magazine (1896) first book (1896) NYE (1908)
throughout Lady Flora Lady Jane Lady Jane
1 1 1
[1–4]
I count my real start from the evening George Corvick, breathless and worried, came in to ask me a service, and more especially from the rapture of hearing it proposed to me… I had done a few things and earned a few pence – I had perhaps even had time to begin to think I was finer than was perceived by the patronising; but when I take the little measure of my course (a fidgety habit, for it’s none of the longest yet) I count my real start from the evening George Corvick, breathless and worried, came in to ask me a service. He had done more things than I, and earned more pence, though there were chances for cleverness I thought he sometimes missed. I could only however that evening declare to him that he never missed one for kindness. There was almost rapture in hearing it proposed to me… I had done a few things and earned a few pence – I had perhaps even had time to begin to think I was finer than was perceived by the patronising; but when I take the little measure of my course (a fidgety habit, for it’s none of the longest yet) I count my real start from the evening George Corvick, breathless and worried, came in to ask me a service. He had done more things than I, and earned more pence, though there were chances for cleverness I thought he sometimes missed. I could only however that evening declare to him that he never missed one for kindness. There was almost rapture in hearing it proposed to me…
1 1 last I was young enough to have an emotion about meeting a man of his renown, and… I was young enough to have an emotion about meeting a man of his renown and… I was young enough for a flutter at meeting a man of his renown, and…
1 2 4 …after some dreadful mistake, abroad, about some climate or some waters, she had suddenly collapsed on the return. …after some dreadful mistake about some climate or some waters she had suddenly collapsed on the return from abroad. …after some dreadful mistake about a climate or a “cure” she had suddenly collapsed on the return from abroad.
11 (last) last 6
(=-3)
…waves that promised (I could perfectly judge) to break eventually with the violence of my own highest tides. …waves that promised, I could perfectly judge, to break in the end with the fury of my own highest tides. …waves that promised, I could perfectly judge, to break in the end with the fury of my own highest tides.
11 (last) last last …there are indeed moments when I feel it to be almost my revenge. …there are indeed moments when I feel it to be almost my revenge. …there are really moments when I feel it to be quite my revenge.

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Glasses
Glasses did not appear in the New York edition but was revised in 1915 for Martin Secker’s Uniform edition of the tales
ch. s. magazine (1896) first book (1896) Uniform Ed. (1916)
1 1 1 Yes, I say to myself,… Yes indeed, I say to myself,… Yes indeed, I say to myself,…
1 2 14
=-3
Blessed conveniences they were, in their hideous, honest potency, – they showed the good lady everything in the world but her own plainness. Blessed conveniences they were, in their hideous, honest strength – they showed the good lady everything in the world but her own queerness. Blest conveniences they were, in their hideous, honest strength – they showed the good lady everything in the world but her own queerness.
1 3 (last) 15
=-3
However, when the young lady moved on… However, when the young lady moved on… However, by the time the young lady moved on…
13 (last) -3 4 (last) …encouragement to try and keep up our relations with her.” …encouragement to try and keep up our relations with her.” …encouragement to keep up relations with her.”
13 (last) last -2 …we literally avoided the subject. …we quite avoided the subject. …we quite avoided the subject.

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The way it came / The friends of the friends
The way it came was retitled The friends of the friends in the New York edition
ch. s. magazine (1896) first book (1896) NYE (1908)
intro. 1 1 Yes, I may say I do find much that’s interesting,… I find, as you prophesied, much that’s interesting,… I find, as you prophesied, much that’s interesting,…
1 2 7 …looked at her in singular distress, with an impatience that was akin to reproach. …looked at her in singular distress, with an impatience that was akin to reproach. …looked at her in singular distress and an impatience that was akin to reproach.
1 2 8 …who were at her heels,… …who were at her heels,… …who were by that time at her heels,…
7 (last) -4 1 He looked at me hard a moment. He looked at me hard. He looked at me hard.
7 (last) -3 9 …she’s not an idiot who has to be credibly informed. …she’s not an idiot who has to be credibly informed. …she ’s not a dull dunce who has to be “credibly informed.”

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John Delavoy
ch. s. magazine (1898) first book (1900)
throughout Winton Windon
throughout Bullen Beston
1 1 8 …would in all likelihood have been pronounced discoverably plain. …would in all likelihood have been pronounced almost occultly so.
1 10 6 [sentence beginning : I permitted her, I confess,…]
…and that there was a kind of stupidity in the air to which perhaps… …and that there was in the air a gross indifference to which perhaps…
7 last 6 (last) “It will be a nice thing!” he remarked;… ‘It will be a ripping little thing!’ he remarked;…
8 (last) no substantive changes

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The turn of the screw
ch. s. magazine (1898) first book (1898) NYE (1909)
intro. 1 1 …somebody happened to remark that it was the only case… …somebody happened to say that it was the only case… …somebody happened to note it as the only case…
intro. 1 2 …the same sight that had shaken him. …the same sight that had shaken him. …the same sight that had shocked him.
1 1 2 …found myself doubtful again,… …found myself doubtful again,… …found all my doubts bristle again,…
24
(last)
44
=-8
last I shrieked, as I tried to press him against me, to my visitant. [missing type: I] shrieked, as I tried to press him against me, to my visitant. I shrieked to my visitant as I tried to press him against me.
24
(last)
-2 last …demonstration of my triumph,… …demonstration of my work,… …demonstration of my work,…

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In the cage
In the cage is also reprinted as a novel (its first publication was as a single volume) and the entries here, which are provided for completeness’ sake, duplicate those on the page of novels’ variants on this site
ch. s. first book (1898) NYE (1908)
1 1 2 …to see any one come in whom she knew, as she called it, outside, and who could add something to the poor identity of her function. …to see any one come in whom she knew outside, as she called it, any one who could add anything to the meanness of her function.
1 2 2 …were no more to her than one of the momentary appearances in the great procession;… …were no more to her than one of the momentary, the practically featureless, appearances in the great procession;…
26 1 8
=-2
…prompted Mrs. Jordan to dash, at a venture, at something that might attenuate criticism. …prompted Mrs. Jordan to dash, a bit wildly, at something, at anything, that might attenuate criticism.
26 22 3 [para. beg. : Our young lady, at this,…]
…future, of no such very different suggestion, at last… …future, of no such very different complexion, at last…
26 22 7 She felt indeed magnanimous in such matters; for if it was very well,… She felt indeed magnanimous in such matters; since if it was very well,…
27
(last)
no substantive changes

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The great condition
there are only about eighteen substantive changes in this tale, and none in the first two chapters
ch. s. magazine (1899) first book (1900)
3 1 3 …looking after his father’s ‘interests’ and his real one that of spending,… …looking after his father’s ‘interests,’ and his actual that of spending,…
3 9 3 …makes anything but a demoralising and most misleading darkness? …makes anything but a most damnable and demoralising darkness?
3 16 2 [para. beg. : ‘Ah!’ said Henry Chilver…]
…but his consciousness was again predominantly… …but his state of mind was again predominantly…
7 (last) 14 1–2 She just visibly hesitated. ‘We only want to be kind to you.’ She just visibly hesitated. ‘He and I only want to be kind to you.’
7 (last) 47 1 In all this time?” Braddle spoke almost with indignation… For all this time?” Braddle spoke almost with indignation…

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‘Europe’
ch. s. magazine (1899) first book (1900) NYE (1908)
1 1 4 …and the end, so far as I was concerned with it, was not till long after;… …and the end, so far as I was concerned with it, was not till long after;… …and the end, so far as I enjoyed a view of it, was not till long after;…
1 2 6–7 …and on such high, superior, exemplary grounds that he was consistent, somehow, even in death. He was likewise understood… …and in such fine declamatory connections that he seemed to gesticulate even from the tomb. He was understood… …and in such fine declamatory connexions that he seemed to gesticulate even from the tomb. He was understood…
1 3 2 …a surrender not justified by anything that she should go, with her daughters, to Europe for her health. …a surrender not justified by anything that she should go, with her daughters, to Europe for her health. …a surrender not justified by anything nameable that she should go to Europe with her daughters and for her health.
3 -5 1 But Becky addressed herself only to me. But Becky only addressed herself to me. But Becky only addressed herself to me.
4 (last) -3 2 It was difficult to me, somehow, to seem to sympathize… It was difficult to me, somehow, to seem to sympathize… It was somehow difficult to me to seem to sympathise…

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Paste
s. first book (1900) NYE (1908)
3 5 …in those dim years, in the way of eccentricity, even bettered… …in those dim years, so far as eccentricity was concerned, even bettered…
25 1 [para. beg. : Charlotte was conscious…]
…Hamlet’s mother had probably been careful to attach… …Hamlet’s mother must have been concerned to attach…
last 3 …though Charlotte felt really morbid too… …though the young person employed in Eaton Square felt really morbid too…

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The real right thing
magazine text not (yet) available to me
ch. s. first book (1900) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 …had been brought to bear upon them by their late client’s widow. …had been applied them by their late client’s widow.
1 1 2 …to Withermore’s knowledge, a very special chapter… …to Withermore’s knowledge a special chapter…
3 (last) -2 2 For himself he could at last but drop upon the sofa… For himself he could at last but sink to the sofa…
3 (last) -2 5
=-2
…and so it was that, for the last time, they faced together their strange question. …and so it was that they for the last time faced together their strange question.

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The great good place
ch. s. magazine (1900) first book (1900) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 George Dane had waked up to a bright new day,… George Dane had waked up to a bright new day,… George Dane had opened his eyes to a bright new day,…
1 1 8 …where the hard light of duty could penetrate every corner,… …where the hard light of duty could penetrate every corner,… …where duty shed its hard light into every corner,…
1 2 last But there, on the table, still were… But there still, on the table, were… But there still on the table were…
5 (last) -8 5 …to withdraw his hand and move softly away. …to withdraw his touch and move softly away. …to withdraw his touch and move softly away.
5 (last) -8 9 It was strange, he at last reflected, but the young man was still there. It was strange, he at last reflected, but the young man was still there. It was strange, he at last mused, but the young man was still there.

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Maud-Evelyn
ch. s. magazine (1900) first book (1900)
1 6 1 …imagination; then, a little to my surprise… …imagination; after which, a little to my surprise…
2 7 1–2 I hesitated. “I guessed.” It might be. ‘I guessed.’
8 (last) -7 1 There was something in her manner that made me go on. There was something in her tone that made me ask more.

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Miss Gunton of Poughkeepsie
s. magazine (1900) first book (1900) NYE (1908)
1 3 …in London, towards the end of May… …in London towards the end of May… …in London toward the end of May…
2 1 …had as yet neither succeeded in understanding… …had as yet succeeded neither in understanding… …had as yet succeeded neither in understanding…
2 5 …as embodied in America, was exposed to criticism –… …as embodied in America, was exposed to criticism –… …as embodied in America, was under criticism –…
-36 1 She hesitated. “No. Yes. … She hesitated. “No. Yes. … She debated. “No. Yes. …
-35 2 [para. beg. : This at least is seemed he could take in.]
‘You mean that one should be quite sure first… ‘You mean that one should be quite sure first… “You mean one should be quite sure first…
-12 1 ‘Oh, I was sure it was!’ the young man murmured. ‘Oh, I was sure it was!’ the young man moaned. ‘Oh I was sure it was!’ the young man moaned.

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The tree of knowledge
there was no magazine appearance of this tale
ch. s. first book (1900) NYE (1908)
1 3 3 …was in a garden-wall on which the stucco was cracked and stained, and in the small… …was in a garden-wall on which the discoloured stucco made patches, and in the small…
4 (last) -8 3 [para. beg. : The young man continued for a moment…]
…appeared to hesitate, for the first time for so long, to say he did know. …appeared to hesitate, for the first time in an age, to say he did know.

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The abasement of the Northmores
there was no magazine appearance of this tale
ch. s. first book (1900) NYE (1908)
1 1 7 His lordship had been a person, in fact, in connection with whom there was almost nothing… His lordship had been a person in connexion with whom – that was it – there was almost nothing…
1 1 11 …and there was quite a kind of tribute to it in the way… …and there was a virtual tribute to it in the way…
5 (last) last -4 …and the type, under her eyes, dispersed. …and the type dispersed under her eyes.

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The tone of time
ch. s. magazine (1900) first book (1903)
1 1 7–8
[7]
She had given up too much. This was why… She had given up too much; this was why…
1 31 9 [para. beg. : It threw me straightway back…]
She goes in for dignity. She goes in for propriety, the real thing.
2 (last) -4 10
(= -2)
Then she herself, by a miracle—!” Then she herself, by a prodigy—!”
2 (last) -2 1 She fairly, for an instant over the miracle, closed her eyes. She fairly, for an instant over the marvel, closed her eyes.

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Broken wings
ch. s. magazine (1900) first book (1903) NYE (1908)
1 2 4 The social ladder, even at Mundham, had – as they might properly… The social ladder, even at Mundham, had – as they might properly… The social ladder had even at Mundham – as they might properly…
1 4 8 …he saw her seated for dinner next his Excellency. …he saw her placed for dinner next his Excellency. …he saw her placed for dinner next his Excellency.
2 1 7 …for it had ended by gathering such a flood as floated forth not only everything in Lady Claude’s own life,… …for it had ended by gathering such a current as floated forth, with everything in Lady Claude’s own life,… …for it had ended by gathering such a current as floated forth, with everything in Lady Claude’s own life,…
5 (last) 1 4 But it was himself above all that he now sharply judged, for women, he felt, … reasons he had, with a sore heart, to acknowledge. But it was himself above all that he now sharply judged, since women, he felt, … reasons he had, with a sore heart, to acknowledge. But it was himself above all he now sharply judged, since women, he felt, … reasons he had to acknowledge with a sore heart.
5 (last) -9 3 [para. beg. : “It’s an article we have to supply?]
“And the strange thing is that they like us.” “And the strange thing is that they like us.” “And the strange thing is they like us.”
5 (last) -2 2 Standing there at her little high-perched window, which overhung grey housetops, they… Standing there at her little high-perched window, which overhung grey housetops, they… United there at her little high-perched window overhanging grey house-tops they…

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The faces / The two faces
The faces was retitled The two faces in both its book and New York edition appearances
ch. s. magazine (1901) first book (1903) NYE (1908)
1 1 2 …justified him, even to the little gleam in the glance… …justified him even to the small scintilla in the glance… …justified him even to the small scintilla in the glance…
1 20 1 (only) [para. beg. : Sutton had to think an instant,…]
…put out a hand with a frank, pleasant “How d’ye do?” …put out a hand with a frank, pleasant “How d’ye do?” …put out a hand with a straight free “How d ’ye do?”
1 -10 1 Mrs. Grantham hesitated but an instant. Mrs. Grantham hesitated but an instant. Mrs. Grantham waited but an instant.
2 1 4 Till he could make up his mind about that, at any rate, he would say nothing; so that, with sufficient presence of mind, he found a better excuse. Till he could make up his mind about that, at any rate, he would say nothing; so that, with sufficient presence of mind, he found a better excuse. Till he should see this clearer, at any rate he would say nothing; so that he found with sufficient presence of mind a better excuse.
2 -6 1 …bold one, by assuming your generosity and placing himself… …bold one, by assuming your generosity and placing himself… …bold one, by treating your generosity as a real thing and placing himself…
3 -31 1
[1–2]
What was in the air descended the next moment to earth; he turned round… What was in the air descended the next moment to earth. He turned round… What was in the air descended the next moment to earth. He turned round…
3 -30 1–2
[1]
…felt himself too noticeably silent. But something… …felt himself too noticeably silent; but something… …felt himself too noticeably silent; but something…

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Mrs Medwin
ch. s. magazine (1901) first book (1903) NYE (1908)
1 1 2 …an “upper half ” so compact that it might have passed for convenient;… …an “upper half ” so concise that it had to pass, boldly, for convenient;… …an “upper half ” so concise that it had to pass boldly for convenient;…
1 1 last
[last two]
…and in a crowd. …and in a crowd. It was like an agency – it bristled with particulars. …and in a crowd. It was like an agency – it bristled with particulars.
1 2 11 …with Miss Cutter in a harmony worthy of wonder. …with Miss Cutter in a harmony worthy of wonder. …with Miss Cutter in a harmony calling for wonder.
1 11 2 [para. beg. : “Well,” remarked Scott,…]
…he spaciously inquired; not as if to a practical end,… …he spaciously inquired, not as if to a practical end,… …he spaciously enquired, not as to a practical end,…
4 (last) 61 2 [para. beg. : “The rest,” she said,…]
…evaded, in her fortitude, another visit from that lady. …evaded, in her fortitude, the reappearance of that lady. …evaded, in her fortitude, the reappearance of that lady.
4 (last) last 3 This one was of the smallest, and it was finally judged to conform… This one was of the smallest, and it was finally judged to conform… This one was of the smallest and was finally judged to conform…

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The Beldonald Holbein
ch. s. magazine (1901) first book (1903) NYE (1908)
1 1 1 Mrs. Munden had not yet been to my studio on so good a pretext as when she first put it to me that… Mrs. Munden had not yet been to my studio on so good a pretext as when she first put it to me that… Mrs. Munden had not yet been to my studio on so good a pretext as when she first intimated that…
1 1 2 …who would really, by-the-way, be a story by herself. …who would really, by the way, be a story in herself. …who would really, by the way, be a story in herself.
1 1 5 …I might easily have imagined that Lady Beldonald was throwing me the handkerchief. …I might easily have imagined that Lady Beldonald was throwing me the handkerchief. …I might easily have imagined her ladyship was throwing me the handkerchief.
1 24 2 [para. beg. : “Oh, a ‘total absence’,” I said,…]
We live in a difficult world.” We live in a worrying world.” We live in a worrying world.”
5 (last) 2 9
[10]
There was scarce a special success, I think, of her companion at which she was not personally present. There was, I think, scarce a special success of her companion’s at which she was not personally present. There was, I think, scarce a special success of her companion’s at which she was not personally present.
5 (last) 3 8 …with a “scratch lot,” as our hostess said, was there, and, the preliminary wait being longish, approached me very sweetly. …with a “scratch lot,” as our hostess said, was there, and, the preliminary wait being longish, approached me very sweetly. …with a “scratch lot,” as our hostess said, was there, so that, the preliminary wait being longish, she could approach me very sweetly.

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The story in it
ch. s. first book (1903) NYE (1908)
1 1 4 …filling the pretty drawing-room,… …filling the pretty saloon,…
1 24 3 (last) [para. beg. : “So that as he evidently isn’t coming,…]
Except that, of course,” she subjoined, “he might come partly for you.” Except that of course,” she threw in, “he might come partly for you.”
3 (last) -23 11 (last) [para. beg. : And Mrs. Dyott conformed,…]
Did that lady know of anything between them? Had that lady the idea of anything between them?
3 (last) -22 1–3 “No. I’m sure. There’s one thing she does know,”… “No. I ’m sure. There ’s one idea she has got,”…

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Flickerbridge
ch. s. magazine (1902) first book (1903) NYE (1908)
1 1 2 …that the pair had been “several times” over so closely contracted. …that the pair had been “several times” over so closely contracted. …that the pair had “several times” over renewed their fond understanding.
1 1 4 What had occurred, at all events, for Granger, in connection… What had occurred for Granger, at all events, in connection… What had occurred for Granger, at all events, in connexion…
5 -2 1 She gave her beautiful laugh. She laughed in clear tones. She laughed in clear tones.
6 (last) 5 1 …it would have been hard to say whether what was in her face was the last failure to follow… …it would have been hard to say whether what was in her face was the last failure to follow… …it would have been hard to say whether what showed in her face was the last failure to follow…
6 (last) 8 11 …blown about the world for all you are and proclaimed for all you are on the housetops. …blown about the world for all you are and proclaimed for all you are on the housetops. …blown about the world ‘for all you ’re worth’ and proclaimed ‘for all you ’re worth’ on the house-tops.
6 (last) 11 1
(all)
“You mean that she and I will be inseparable?” “You mean that she and I will be inseparable?” “You mean she and I will be inseparable?”

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The beast in the jungle
there was no magazine appearance of this tale
ch. s. first book (1903) NYE (1909)
1 1 7
=-2
…he needed to wander apart to feel in a proper relation with them, though his doing so was not,… …he needed some straying apart to feel in a proper relation with them, though this impulse was not,…
1 2 1 It led, in short, in the course… It led, briefly, in the course…
6
(last)
last 3 Her spoken words came back to him, and the chain… Her spoken words came back to him the chain…
6
(last)
last last …he flung himself, on his face, on the tomb. …he flung himself, face down, on the tomb.

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The birthplace
there was no magazine appearance of this tale
ch. s. first book (1903) NYE (1909)
1 2 12 (last) This was a situation in which his general intelligence – acknowledged as his strong point – was doubtless conceived, around him, as feeling less of a strain… This was a situation in which his general intelligence – admittedly his strong point – was doubtless imaged, around him, as feeling less of a strain…
1 3 1 …were a challenge to his temper,… …were a challenge to his nerves,…
7 (last) -2 2 But Isabel, with almost a shriek, was the first to recover hers. But Isabel, almost with a shriek, was the first to recover hers.

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Fordham Castle
s. magazine (1904) NYE (1909)
throughout Lily Sue
1 1 …carried on the pleasant pension …carried on the pleasant pension
1 last …and I’m sure she would like to know you.” …and I ’m sure she ’d like to know you.”
15 8 [para. beg. : “Places like Rome and Constantinople?” … – just after the first set of short speech paragraphs]
…and to that degree that when Abel’s interlocutress happened to lay down on the parapet… …and to that degree that when Abel’s fellow guest happened to lay down on the parapet…
11 Her daughter had put her out to board, pending important operations, just as Lily had put him… Her daughter had put her out at cheap board, pending higher issues, just as Sue had put him…
83 [=-29] 6 [para. beg. : “By my death. And also…]
She knew I would die,… She knew I ’d die off,…
last -2 …and to himself at least he could express it without fear of protest. …and to himself at least could express it without fear of protest.

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Julia Bride
Harper’s independent book edition closely follows the text of their earlier magazine publication – having only a few substantive changes – despite the fact that it appeared after completion of the New York edition with its revised text; the magazine and independent book text is in two parts, the first of which has a line-space between paragraphs 14 and 15 that becomes the start of chapter 2 in NYE: the original part 2 becomes the whole of chapter 3 in NYE
ch. s. magazine (1908) NYE (1909) independent book (1909)
1 1 1 …those that descended from the galleries… …those that descend from the galleries… …those that descended from the galleries…
1 2 1 …yet if he wanted, in that degree, to break the spell… …yet if he wanted in such a degree to break the spell… …yet if he desired, in that degree, to break the spell…
1 2 2 …when she took the measure, instantly, of all she yet missed. …when she instantly took the measure of all she yet missed. …when she took the measure, instantly, of all she yet missed.
2 [3]
(last)
19 5 She could have repeated afterwards the detail… She could have repeated afterwards the detail… She could have repeated later on the detail…
2 [3]
(last)
20 6 [para. beg. : They trod then afresh their ancient paths;…]
…awkwardness of that possible failure of his measure of her charm,… …awkwardness of that possible lapse of his measure of her charm,… …awkwardness of that possible failure of his measure of her charm,…
2 [3]
(last)
last 1 It was all in his expression; he couldn’t keep it out of that, and his shining good looks… It was all in his expression; he could n’t keep it undetected, and his shining good looks… It was all in his expression; he couldn’t keep it out of that, and his shining good looks…

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The jolly corner
ch. s. magazine (1908) NYE (1909)
throughout Mrs. Muldoody Mrs. Muldoon
1 1 3 …as the matter in fact presented itself, having promptly enough taken the first place among the surprises, as he would have called them, attending his so strangely belated return to America. …as the situation in fact presented itself, having promptly enough taken the first place in the considerable array of rather unattenuated surprises attending his so strangely belated return to America.
1 1 4 …so much margin for preparation. …so much margin for play.
3 (last) -19
[-17]
1 But she kept her clearness. But she kept the clearness that was like the breath of infallibility.
3 (last) -8 2 Yet though it all brought for him… But though it all brought for him…
3 (last) -2 1 Aie!” Brydon winced… Ah!” Brydon winced…

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The velvet glove
the following table lists the only substantive variant between the two sources of The velvet glove (that in chapter 1), together with two typographical errors, the first of which (marked *) may well be an error in The English review – although it is impossible to determine, by context alone, the correct reading; it has proved to be difficult for some editors of the 1910 book text to spot the final error
ch. s. magazine (1909) first book (1910)
1 1 2 …of missing everywhere as little of the human scene as possible,… …of missing everywhere no more of the human scene than possible,…
3 (last) 3 last …and anything else she liked indeed… …and anything else he liked indeed… *
3 (last) 13 4 (last) [para. beg. : Nothing stranger could conceivably…]
…an escape from a state that he felt himself fairly flatter by thinking of it as “awkward”;… …an escape from a state that he felt himself fairly flattered by thinking of it as “awkward”;…

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Mora Montravers
the following table lists all the substantive variants between the two sources of Mora Montravers, including three, or even four, examples which may well be typographical errors, but which certainly offer valid alternative readings (remember that James was dictating his fiction to a typist by this time, so the chance of the printers having misread their copy is minimal)
ch. s. magazine (1909) first book (1910)
2 1 7 …much more searching than shifting eyes,… …much more searching than shifting look,…
3 12 2 By this felicity it was he who showed… By this facility it was he who showed…
3 15 1 The danger descried by Sidney Traffle… The danger described by Sidney Traffle…
4 31 6 In short she has shown you how much she does mind them. In short she had shown you how much she does mind them.
6 (last) 96 1 “A month after – their form; and she seems to think it handsome, he says, that she has waited the month. “A month after – their form; and she seems to think it handsome, he says, that she waited the month.
6 (last) -4 1 She seemed to wonder a little at this press of questions,… She seemed to wonder a little at his press of questions,…

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Crapy Cornelia
the following table lists all the substantive variants between the two sources of Crapy Cornelia, including two typographical queries in The finer grain : one definite error (marked *), a real howler, as it involves the first occurrence of the tale’s title epithet; and one possible one (marked ), where the later reading would make sense with a comma after ‘Germans’;
the five sections/chapters are not numbered in the periodical text, but they are separated by blank lines, so an alternative paragraph numbering is not given below
ch. s. magazine (1909) first book (1910)
1 3 7
=-2
…an impulse as sharp and a self-respect as reasoned; a self-respect that hadn’t in the least suffered,… …an impulse as sharp and a self-respect that hadn’t in the least suffered,…
1 5 1
[1–2]
…introduced and committed; on our friend’s part… …introduced and committed. On our friend’s part…
2 1 2 …the first act of some small, expensively mounted comic opera,… …the first act of some small and expensively mounted comic opera,…
2 3 1 …a little person with her secret of pride. …a little person with her secret pride.
2 last last The moment after which she was gone. The moment after which she had gone.
3 1 8
=-2
…had their common past committed him to crapy Cornelia? …had their common past committed him to crazy Cornelia? *
3 6 5 …she was the only person in an hotel full of roaring, gorging, smoking Germans with whom I could have a word of talk. …she was the only person in an hotel of roaring, gorging, smoking Germans with whom I couldn’t have a word of talk. 
4 3 4 …just where they had left it; and even with the consciousness… …just where they had left it; even with the consciousness…
5 (last) 63 2 [para. beg. : “With them – these modern wonders;…]
“It must have been to help me you’ve got back.” “It must have been to help me you’ve come back.”
5 (last) -7 2 …carte-de-visite, over which, folding it together with deliberation, he put it back. …carte-de-visite, folding it together with deliberation over which he put it back.

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The bench of desolation
the following table lists sample variants from the start and end of the tale as usual, but treats the two book editions separately because of the substantive variants in chapter 6 (all of which are therefore shown); the difference in paragraph 27 of chapter 6 is almost certainly a Methuen misprint, but the alternative reading is not an impossibility; note also that the magazine has James’s spaced contractions (for example ‘could n’t’) even though they were not part of the magazine’s house style: these are not listed as variants here
ch. s. magazine (1909-1910) USA book (1910) UK book (1910)
1 1 1 …what he would fain have called a little more confidently the strength of his position… …what he would fain have called a little more aggressively the strength of his position… …what he would fain have called a little more aggressively the strength of his position…
1 3 8
=-2
It was what it meant in a woman all through,… It was what might signify in a woman all through,… It was what might signify in a woman all through,…
6
(last)
6 2 …he had at these moments breathed to himself with the intensity… …he had at these moments audibly breathed – breathed with the intensity… …he had at these moments audibly breathed – breathed with the intensity…
6
(last)
10 1 …her reticule, from which she drew, not a handful of gold… …her reticule, from which she took, not a handful of gold… …her reticule, extracting from it, not a handful of gold…
6
(last)
11 1 …their old place of tryst, which had been, all the years,… …their old place of tryst, which had been, through the years,… …their old place of tryst, which had been, through the years,…
6
(last)
27 1 “But that you could live all the while and save that—!” “But that you could live all the while and save that—!” “But that you could live all the while and have that—!”
[to me this looks like a misprint in the UK edition]
6
(last)
52
=-6
1 “Never,” she all oddly replied. “Never,” she all oddly replied. “Never,” she most oddly replied.

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A round of visits
the following table lists all the substantive variants between the two sources of A round of visits, together with one significant difference in punctuation
ch. s. magazine (1910) first book (1910)
2 3 5 It wasn’t that he wanted to be pitied… It wasn’t that he wished to be pitied…
6 1 8 (last) …though why should he just now… …though why should one just now…
6 8 1 (only) … “he’d see I bear up ;  pretty well!” … “he’d see I bear up pretty well!”
7 (last) 7 3 …with his back turned, as Mark now… …with his back shown, as Mark now…

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If you have any problems with the above tables, or would like help with identifying the source of any particular text, please feel free to contact me. Together we may be able to build up a more comprehensive online resource.

Adrian Dover

you can go to the menu of tales’ index pages